Author : Ariel Leve
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
Publisher : HarperCollins
ISBN : 9780062269478
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 288 page
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“Sometimes, a child is born to a parent who can’t be a parent, and, like a seedling in the shade, has to grow toward a distant sun. Ariel Leve’s spare and powerful memoir will remind us that family isn’t everything—kindness and nurturing are.” —Gloria Steinem Ariel Leve grew up in Manhattan with an eccentric mother she describes as “a poet, an artist, a selfappointed troublemaker and attention seeker.” Leve learned to become her own parent, taking care of herself and her mother’s needs. There would be uncontrolled, impulsive rages followed with denial, disavowed responsibility, and then extreme outpourings of affection. How does a child learn to feel safe in this topsyturvy world of conditional love? Leve captures the chaos and lasting impact of a child’s life under siege and explores how the coping mechanisms she developed to survive later incapacitated her as an adult. There were material comforts, but no emotional safety, except for summer visits to her father’s home in South East Asia-an escape that was terminated after he attempted to gain custody. Following the death of a loving caretaker, a succession of replacements raised Leve-relationships which resulted in intense attachment and loss. It was not until decades later, when Leve moved to other side of the world, that she could begin to emancipate herself from the past. In a relationship with a man who has children, caring for them yields a clarity of what was missing. In telling her haunting story, Leve seeks to understand the effects of chronic psychological maltreatment on a child’s developing brain, and to discover how to build a life for herself that she never dreamed possible: An unabbreviated life.

Author : Mark Kishlansky
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
Publisher : National Geographic Books
ISBN : 9780141987347
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 0 page
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The tragedy of Charles I dominates one of the most strange and painful periods in British history as the whole island tore itself apart over a deadly, entangled series of religious and political disputes. In Mark Kishlansky's brilliant account it is never in doubt that Charles created his own catastrophe, but he was nonetheless opposed by men with far fewer scruples and less consistency who for often quite contradictory reasons conspired to destroy him. This is a remarkable portrait of one of the most talented, thoughtful, loyal, moral, artistically alert and yet, somehow, disastrous of all this country's rulers.

Author : Debananda Singh Ningthoujam
Genre : Art
Publisher : Blue Rose Publishers
ISBN :
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 234 page
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Abbreviated Lives profiles the life stories of artists, scientists & writers whose creative odysseys have been cut short by circumstances: penury, lack of recognition, mental breakdown, dictatorship and war etc. It also portrays the Matilda effect: how some women’s contributions have been ‘stolen’ by male colleagues, supervisors or husbands. However tragic the conditions in which they might have worked, all the characters in this book took passionate creative journeys till the final exit. From them, we may reaffirm that the journey matters more than the destination; one can rise to great heights in life given grit, commitment and hard work. These tragic stories also teach us that the efflorescence of artistic and scientific creativity needs democracy and freedom of thought; it may be cruelly stifled, if not completely destroyed, by unscrupulous dictators and authoritarian rulers. These tales not only can inspire the readers to carry forward their own journeys; moreover, they may ignite us to promote institutional, cultural and social factors that would help nurture the full blossoming of creative lives so that the society may fully ‘harvest’ their artistic, literary and scientific contributions. Sincere creative journeys, the lonely expeditions of pioneers would never go in vain; someday, kindred spirits would retrace the paths blazed by the forerunners.

Author : Andrew Wilson
Genre : Evolution
Publisher :
ISBN : IOWA:31858015770419
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 383 page
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Author : Nicholas Saul
Genre : Literary Criticism
Publisher : BRILL
ISBN : 9789004427075
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 296 page
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In Interrogations of Evolutionism in German Literature 1859-2011 Nicholas Saul offers the first representative account of German literary responses to Darwinian evolutionism from from Raabe and Jensen via Ernst Jünger and Botho Strauß to Dietmar Dath.

Author : John V. Tolan
Genre : Art
Publisher : Oxford University Press
ISBN : 9780199239726
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 399 page
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In September, 1219, Francis of Assisi went to Egpyt to preach to Sultan al-Malik al-Kâmil. John Tolan examines the varying depictions of this brief but highly significant meeting and how they reveal the changing fears and hopes that Muslim-Christian encounters have inspired in European artists and writers in the centuries since.

Author : Stefan Larsson
Genre : Religion
Publisher : BRILL
ISBN : 9789004232877
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 374 page
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Best known today as the author of the Life of Milarepa, Tsangnyön Heruka (1452–1507) was one of the most influential mad yogins of Tibet. Stefan Larsson’s Crazy for Wisdom, describes Tsangnyön Heruka's life, based on narratives by his disciples, and examines an unexpected aspect of fifteenth-century Tibetan Buddhist practice.

Author : Michael J. Braddick
Genre : History
Publisher : OUP Oxford
ISBN : 9780191667268
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 672 page
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This Handbook brings together leading historians of the events surrounding the English revolution, exploring how the events of the revolution grew out of, and resonated, in the politics and interactions of the each of the Three Kingdoms - England, Scotland, and Ireland. It captures a shared British and Irish history, comparing the significance of events and outcomes across the Three Kingdoms. In doing so, the Handbook offers a broader context for the history of the Scottish Covenanters, the Irish Rising of 1641, and the government of Confederate Ireland, as well as the British and Irish perspective on the English civil wars, the English revolution, the Regicide, and Cromwellian period. The Oxford Handbook of the English Revolution explores the significance of these events on a much broader front than conventional studies. The events are approached not simply as political, economic, and social crises, but as challenges to the predominant forms of religious and political thought, social relations, and standard forms of cultural expression. The contributors provide up-to-date analysis of the political happenings, considering the structures of social and political life that shaped and were re-shaped by the crisis. The Handbook goes on to explore the long-term legacies of the crisis in the Three Kingdoms and their impact in a wider European context.

Author : Randall Woods
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
ISBN : 9781416593317
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 1024 page
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For almost forty years, the verdict on Lyndon Johnson's presidency has been reduced to a handful of harsh words: tragedy, betrayal, lost opportunity. Initially, historians focused on the Vietnam War and how that conflict derailed liberalism, tarnished the nation's reputation, wasted lives, and eventually even led to Watergate. More recently, Johnson has been excoriated in more personal terms: as a player of political hardball, as the product of machine-style corruption, as an opportunist, as a cruel husband and boss. In LBJ, Randall B. Woods, a distinguished historian of twentieth-century America and a son of Texas, offers a wholesale reappraisal and sweeping, authoritative account of the LBJ who has been lost under this baleful gaze. Woods understands the political landscape of the American South and the differences between personal failings and political principles. Thanks to the release of thousands of hours of LBJ's White House tapes, along with the declassification of tens of thousands of documents and interviews with key aides, Woods's LBJ brings crucial new evidence to bear on many key aspects of the man and the politician. As private conversations reveal, Johnson intentionally exaggerated his stereotype in many interviews, for reasons of both tactics and contempt. It is time to set the record straight. Woods's Johnson is a flawed but deeply sympathetic character. He was born into a family with a liberal Texas tradition of public service and a strong belief in the public good. He worked tirelessly, but not just for the sake of ambition. His approach to reform at home, and to fighting fascism and communism abroad, was motivated by the same ideals and based on a liberal Christian tradition that is often forgotten today. Vietnam turned into a tragedy, but it was part and parcel of Johnson's commitment to civil rights and antipoverty reforms. LBJ offers a fascinating new history of the political upheavals of the 1960s and a new way to understand the last great burst of liberalism in America. Johnson was a magnetic character, and his life was filled with fascinating stories and scenes. Through insights gained from interviews with his longtime secretary, his Secret Service detail, and his closest aides and confidants, Woods brings Johnson before us in vivid and unforgettable color.

Author : Jacqueline Rose
Genre : Social Science
Publisher : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN : 9780374715830
Type book : PDF, Epub, Kindle and Mobi
File Download : 256 page
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A simple argument guides this book: motherhood is the place in our culture where we lodge, or rather bury, the reality of our own conflicts. By making mothers the objects of both licensed idealization and cruelty, we blind ourselves to the world’s iniquities and shut down the portals of the heart. Mothers are the ultimate scapegoat for our personal and political failings, for everything that is wrong with the world, which becomes their task (unrealizable, of course) to repair. Moving commandingly between pop cultural references such as Roald Dahl’s Matilda to insights on motherhood in the ancient world and the contemporary stigmatization of single mothers, Jacqueline Rose delivers a groundbreaking report into something so prevalent we hardly notice. Mothers is an incisive, rousing call to action from one of our most important contemporary thinkers.